Saturday, January 31, 2009

The Marines’ Cost on Iwo Jima

The body of a dead United States Marine, killed during the vicious fighting on Iwo Jima, remains in a fighting position — note bullet hole in helmet. The American casualties for the battle were 6,821 dead and 19,189 wounded.

Thursday, January 29, 2009

To the Shores of Iwo Jima — Part 1

“To the Shores of Iwo Jima” is a 1945 Kodachrome color short war film produced by the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. It documents the Battle of Iwo Jima, and was the first time that American audiences saw in color the footage of the famous flag raising on Iwo Jima.

The film follows the servicemen through the battle in rough chronological order, from the bombardment of the island by warships and carrier-based airplanes to the final breakdown of resistance — though, after it shows the taking of Suribachi, it then switches to the footage of the second flag raising.

The film ends by acknowledging the 4,000 men who died in the month-long battle, and tells the audience that their deaths weren't in vain, showing a bomber aircraft taking off from the island for a mission over Japan.

Four cameramen, including Bill Genaust, who shot the famous flag raising sequence, died bringing this footage to the public. Ten were wounded. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Beach Unloading — Iwo Jima

U.S. Marines unload equipment & supplies onto the sands of Iwo Jima from large Coast Guard & Navy landing craft shortly after troops gained a foothold on the strategically important island — February 19, 1945.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Assault Waves on Iwo Jima

On February 19, 1945, the large armada of U.S. Navy ships bringing American Marines & supplies toward the island beachheads of Iwo Jima is seen during the opening hours of the battle. This is the view looking East to West — Mt. Suribachi is seen at left.

Monday, January 26, 2009

Iwo Jima Blast

American Marines crouch for cover below a hillside while detonating a large explosive charge. It was intended to destroy part of the cave network connecting Japanese fortifications dug into the ground on the island of Iwo Jima — February 1945.

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Hitler Reviews the Troops — 1938

German F├╝hrer and Chancellor Adolf Hitler receives the salute of the Columns in Adolf Hitler Platz during the Reichs Party Congress in Nuremburg, Germany — September 1938.

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

In the Early Years of the Third Reich

“One People! One Government! One Leader!” This well-known Nazi rallying cry, popularized by Joseph Goebbels’s propaganda machine, is emblazoned on an army truck engaged in a recruiting drive in Straubing, Bavaria.

Monday, January 19, 2009

The Russian Campaign Bogs Down

On January 4, 1942, the German Sixth Army meteorologist recorded a temperature of 42 degrees below zero. Severe frost and deep snowdrifts badly hampered the supply lines. Hitler’s vaunted “Blitzkrieg” invasion of the Soviet Union had ground to a halt. Not even the most up-to-date technology could cope with the unusual weather conditions. As a result, horses came into their own once again, and had to be requisitioned throughout the Third Reich. They were not enough, however, to effect any improvement in the terrible transport conditions.

Sunday, January 18, 2009

"Howlin' Mad" Smith — 1944

General Holland McTyeire "Howlin' Mad" Smith (April 20, 1882 – January 12, 1967) served several commands in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. He is sometimes called the "father" of modern U.S. amphibious warfare.

On the eve of World War II, General Smith directed extensive Army, Navy, and Marine amphibious training, which was a major factor in successful U.S. landings in both the Atlantic and Pacific. Later, he helped prepare U.S. Army and Canadian troops for the Kiska and Attu landings, then led the V Amphibious Corps in the assaults on the Gilberts, the Marshalls, and Saipan, and Tinian in the Marianas.

During the Marianas operation, besides the V Amphibious Corps, he commanded all Expeditionary Troops, including those which recaptured Guam. After that, he served as the first Commanding General of Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, and headed Task Force 56 (Expeditionary Troops) at Iwo Jima, which included all the assault troops in that battle.

Saturday, January 17, 2009

Seeking Divine Guidance

In an example of both sides of a conflict feeling that God is on their side, German Sixth Army troops are seen attending a divine service in the field before going into battle against Soviet forces — June 1941.

Friday, January 16, 2009

World At War: On Our Way — Part 6

The United States moves towards involvement in the Second World War, as documented by the “World at War” series.

Thursday, January 15, 2009

World At War: On Our Way — Part 5

The United States moves towards involvement in the Second World War, as documented by the “World at War” series.

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

World At War: On Our Way — Part 4

The United States moves towards involvement in the Second World War, as documented by the “World at War” series.

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

World At War: On Our Way — Part 3

The United States moves towards involvement in the Second World War, as documented by the “World at War” series.

Monday, January 12, 2009

World At War: On Our Way — Part 2

The United States moves towards involvement in the Second World War, as documented by the “World at War” series.

Sunday, January 11, 2009

World At War: On Our Way — Part 1

The United States moves towards involvement in the Second World War, as documented by the “World at War” series.

Saturday, January 10, 2009

One Year On Board the U.S.S. Yorktown — Pt. 7

For some unknown reason, the host of Part 7 of our series on the U.S. Navy carrier “U.S.S. Yorktown” has not allowed us to embed the final installment. It can be viewed, however, by following this link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovorGgLIP5Q&feature=related